Stay Connected This Summer!

Summertime in the library is, in many ways, business as usual. Whether or not you are on campus, Brookens Library faculty, staff, and student employees are still here working to support your experience at UIS.

  • What’s New at Brookens: Want to stay informed about Brookens Library news, events, and more? Follow this blog!
    Here we highlight library collections, important library resource updates, information about fun library events, including The Haunted Library, and more. We know that library use improves student GPA and retention rates so we encourage all our students to utilized library resources and attend library events. You can also find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 

  • Cloud Library: Brookens Library recently added 19,000 eAudiobook titles to Cloud Library, our eBook and eAudiobook collection. You and your student can browse our collection here – http://go.uis.edu/BrowseCloudLibrary

The collection includes leisure reads, cookbooks, memoires, and more.
Current students can download the Cloud Library App to their device or check out a Cloud Library compatible device from Brookens Library. For more information about how to get started using Cloud Library visit: http://go.uis.edu/CloudLibraryBasics

 

  • Mango Languages: You’re probably wondering why the library’s talking about fruit, turns out were not. Mango Languages is our online language-learning system. Your student can create a free account through the Mango Languages platform using their NetID and Password. Once they’ve created their account, your student will have access to over 70 languages.
    Learn more about all that Mango Languages has to offer here- http://go.uis.edu/MangoBasics

Stay connected with Brookens all summer long and see you in the Fall!

Alison Flowers, Author of Exoneree Diaries to Speak June 9

The Friends of Brookens Library at the University of Illinois Springfield have selected Alison Flowers, author of The Exoneree Diaries: The Fight for Innocence, Independence, and Identity, as the guest speaker for the organization’s annual dinner. The dinner portion of the even is for members of the Friends of Brookens Library and the lecture by Flowers is free and open to the public.

John Hanlon, the Executive Director and Legal Director of the Illinois Innocence Project at the University of Illinois Springfield (UIS) will be a special guest at the lecture and will be making remarks.

The event begins at 7:00 pm in the Brookens Auditorium (Lower Level – Brookens Library) on the UIS Campus. A Q/A and book signing will immediately follow.

About The Exoneree Diaries:

Through intimate portraits of four exonerated prisoners, journalist Alison Flowers explores what happens to innocent people after the state flings open the jailhouse door and tosses them back, empty-handed, into the unknown.

From the front lines of the wrongful conviction capital of the United States—Cook County, Illinois—investigative journalist Alison Flowers recounts profoundly human stories of reclaiming life, overcoming adversity, and searching for purpose after exoneration.

As she tells each exoneree’s powerful story, Flowers vividly shows that release from prison, though sometimes joyous and hopeful, is not a Hollywood ending—or an ending at all. Rather, an exoneree’s first unshackled steps are the beginning of a new journey full of turmoil and uncertainty. Flowers also sheds new light on the collateral damage of wrongful convictions on families and communities, confronting deeper problems of mass incarceration and the criminal justice system. (Amazon)

Pop-Up Book Sale at “Late Nite” Breakfast

The end of the semester is near, which means it’s time for the annual SAC “Late Night Breakfast”. This year we will be having a pop-up book sale at the Late Nite Breakfast event.

The event takes place from 9:00 pm – 10:30 pm in the PAC Lower Level (Food Emporium).

Paperbacks are $1 and hardbacks are $2, so be sure to come with a couple of bucks in your pocket and pick up some summer reads!

See you at the Late Nite Breakfast 

Congratulations Graduates

We would like to congratulate all of this year’s graduates.  We hope your time here has helped prepare you for your next steps!

At the library, we have 9 student employees graduating this semester.  We are so proud of their accomplishments and will greatly miss their daily presence at the library. 

 

Congratulations

(Top left to right) Alejandro, Carolyn, Tabbitha, Gaby, Janki

(Bottom left to right) Mac, Scott, Stephen and Kinsey

Snapshot Day!

Today, Wednesday April 19, 2017 is Snapshot Day: A Day in the Life of Brookens Library.

What we hope to achieve on this “Day in the Life”, is a picture of what people are coming to Brookens Library for through photographs and a brief survey. We also have an online survey to capture why people are coming to our website.

If you visit us, on-ground or online, we hope you take a moment to let us know what you came here for so we can provide you with the best experience possible in the future. Check back here to see photos from Snapshot Day!

Library Bill of Rights, Article V

It’s National Library Week, April 9-15!

People often don’t know much about the work that libraries do, or that there is a Library Bill of Rights. That’s right, we have our own guiding principles that help determine how we serve our patrons and communities. We hope you learn a little big more of our library, our librarians and the Library Bill of Rights during National Library Week.

Throughout National Library Week, the Faculty at Brookens Library will be sharing a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. Each of the points we’ll be discussing come with their own special challenges and obstacles. Today we are featuring Article V.

WEEK 5

Article V.  A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

In many ways, libraries are the great equalizer. No matter your educational background, your age, your beliefs, or any other aspect of your identity, libraries are open to all, so that all may obtain the resources they need. Creating and maintaining diverse collections, providing unfiltered access to the Internet, and making costly subscription-based online resources available is our foundation. But these collections and services would be meaningless if we limited access to select groups of people. For that reason, I find article 5 of the Library Bill of Rights to be the most impactful.

As an academic library serving a campus community, our primary focus is the university’s student, staff, and faculty. But our resources and services are not limited to those populations. Our doors are open to all. Research is not exclusively done by those with access to a college education. Using computers and the internet are more increasingly the only way to participate in certain basic functions of daily life, and information literacy is not a skill just for the classroom, but for life. Serving Springfield and beyond is an important part of our job.

This openness extends beyond serving patrons who are not affiliated with our university, but has a much broader scope. Brookens, like all libraries adhering to the Library Bill of Rights, places no limitations on patrons based on their origin, age, background, or views. Just like we make both sides of the issue available in our collections, we make that collection available to those with beliefs on either side of the issue, as well as those in-between and undecided. Additionally, we make no assumptions about what people of particular groups will want or need when providing resources. Instead, deciding what resources are appropriate or of interest is entirely up to each individual to decide, and they will be able to do so without censorship or judgment.

It is our honor to serve our UIS community as well as the community at-large and our responsibility to continue to advocate for their right to access the information all of our patrons need or desire.

Written By: Sarah Sagmoen, Director of Learning Commons and User Services