Native American Heritage Month

In honor of November being Native American Heritage Month, Brookens Library is highlighting some of its resources that focus on the rich history, the variety of cultures and the many contributions of Native Americans to our world.

The Library of Congress, in collaboration with other museums and archives, created the Native American Heritage Month web portal, which features a collection of exhibits, images, audio and video that highlights the important contributions made by the indigenous people of America.

Interested in learning Cherokee? Our Mango Languages database provides language lessons on Cherokee grammar, vocabulary and culture. Just go to their page to set up your free account and get started in minutes.

To find more facts on Native American tribes, try the eHRAF database, a great library resource for finding information about different cultures around the world.

If looking for more books to add to your TBR list, check out the works of these Native American authors – Sherman Alexie, Louise Erdrich, Scott Momaday, Linda Hogan, and Leslie Marmon Silko.

We encourage you to learn more about Native American peoples and their heritage, no matter what month it is. For more information on Native American Heritage Month, click here.

How To Tuesday – Study Spots!

As midterms creep up on us all (can you believe it’s October??), we at Brookens Library welcome all patrons to our unique study spaces.

The first floor is not a quiet floor and is perfect for collaborative work. Look at Megan and Taylor having brain blasts!

The library stairwell lounges located on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th floors are also great for collaborative work. We have whiteboards and markers available for you to jot down all your brilliant notes and ideas. These collaborative spaces are also great for working alone if you don’t mind a little background noise.

Quiet study locations are found on the 3rd and 4th floors. When it is time to hunker down and focus on that reading or essay, get comfortable in our quiet and peaceful cubbies and tables.

On our quiet floors there are a few locations like lounges (pictured above) and large tables to also study quietly with friends. Or get into passionate—yet hushed— debates!

Finally, if you are someone who finds that their best work occurs when surrounded by nature, Brookens Library has plenty of tables to sit at outside.

Come seek out your perfect study spot at Brookens Library! Happy learning!

 

Movements of the ’60s, Diane Nash Inspired Library Resources

The Movements of the ‘60s: A Legacy for Today, Diane Nash  

Brookens Library is proud to have co-sponsored the ECCE Speaker Series event The Movements of the ‘60s: A Legacy for Today, Diane Nash on Thursday, September 13. To bridge the event with our Collections, Faculty Librarian Nancy Weichert brought a mobile checkout station and a small collection of materials related to Nash’s area of work.  Sarah Sagmoen, Director of User Services & faculty liaison to Necessary Steps, and University Librarian Dean Piotrowski also participated in the event.

Diane Nash’s involvement in the nonviolent movement began in 1959 when she was a student at Fisk University. In 1960, she became the chairperson of the student sit-in movement in Nashville – the first southern city to desegregate its lunch counters – as well as one of the founding students of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee. She coordinated the Freedom Ride from Birmingham, Alabama to Jackson, Mississippi in 1961. Her arrests for civil rights activities culminated in Nash being imprisoned for 30 days in 1961, while she was pregnant with her first child. Undeterred, she went on to join a national committee—to which she was appointed by President John F. Kennedy—that promoted passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Nash later became active in the peace movement that worked to end the Vietnam War, and became an instructor in the philosophy and strategy of non-violence as developed by Mohandas Gandhi.
(source)

A Selection of Online Library Resources Available Through Brookens

The African-American Years: Chronologies of American History and Experience

Discusses the history of African Americans from pre-colonial times to the present. Includes memoirs, letters, family histories, newspapers, oral histories, and city directories, providing historical evidence to help understand and interpret past events.

Black Thought and Culture 

1,303 sources with 1,210 authors, covering the non-fiction published works of leading African Americans. Where possible the complete published non-fiction works are included, as well as interviews, journal articles, speeches, essays, pamphlets, letters and other fugitive material.

Black Studies in Video

Featuring award-winning documentaries, newsreels, interviews and archival footage surveying the evolution of black culture in the United States. Includes films covering history, politics, art and culture, family structure, social and economic pressures, and gender relations

America History & Life

Published since 1964, this is the definitive bibliographic reference covering the history, culture, area studies, and current affairs literature of the United States and Canada, from prehistory to the present.

Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000 

Organized around the history of women in social movements in the U.S. between 1600 and 2000, this collection seeks to advance scholarly debates and understanding about U.S. women’s history
The collection currently includes 125 document projects and archives with more than 5,100 documents and 175,000 pages of additional full-text documents, written by 2,800 primary authors. It also includes book, film, and website reviews, notes from the archives, and teaching tools.

The Sixties: Primary Documents and Personal Narratives 1960 – 1974

Brings the 1960s alive through diaries, letters, autobiographies and other memoirs, written and oral histories, manifestos, government documents, memorabilia, and scholarly commentary. With 125,000 pages of text and 50 hours of video at completion, this searchable collection is the definitive electronic resource for students and scholars researching this important period in American history, culture, and politics.

 

A selection of Print Library Resources Available Through Brookens

Freedom riders: 1961 and the struggle for racial justice by Raymond Arsenault
Black revolt; strategies of protest by Doris Yvonne Wilkinson
Strategies for freedom: the changing patterns of black protest by Bayard Rustin
Black protest in the sixties by August Meier
The lost dream of equality: critical essays on education and social class by Alan Scott
Women and the civil rights movement, 1954-1965 by Davis Houck
Living through the civil rights movement by Charles George
Voices of freedom: an oral history of the civil rights movement from the 1950s through the 1980s by Henry Hampton
The origins of nonviolence: Tolstoy and Gandhi in their historical settings by Martin Burgress Green
Many minds, one heart: SNCC’s dream for a new America by Wesley Hogan
Teaching peace: nonviolence and the liberal arts by Denny Wever

 

A selection of Films Available Through Brookens

Reflections unheard: black women in civil rights by Yello Kat Productions
Freedom riders by American Experience
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Natalie Bullock Brown
Ghandi by Hartwick Classic Film
Freedom bound by Harvey Richards
We’ll never turn back by Harvey Richards

Meet the Team: James

Name: James

Major: Business Administratrion

Status: Senior

What is your favorite thing about being a student at UIS?  I can use any materials in UIS. Professors are very kind and friendly. I can make a lot of friends.

What are your goals for the semester? I want to get an A in my Capstone class. Once I have completed my degree I want to get Graduate Public Service Internship or Graduate Assistant position and apply for a Master of Science in Management Information Systems. 

If there were a reality TV show of your life, what would it be called? Why?  Peaceful life. Because I want to get a lot of money. Then, I will find a peaceful island to live for the rest of my life.

Are you involved in any clubs/activities/sports on campus? Or what are your hobbies? I like basketball and working out. I usually go to TRAC when I feel tired.

What have you learned since working at the library?  I have learned about time management and team work. 

What are your post-graduation plans?  I plan earn my Master of Science in Management Information Systems and to get a job when I graduate, and to make more friends.

What is your favorite thing from the library of things collection? Japanese Manga Collection

How To Suggest an eBook or eAudiobook in cloudLibrary!

Did you know we have THOUSANDS of eBooks & eAudiobooks in cloudLibrary? It’s true! However, there may be an eBook or eAudiobook that we don’t have that you would like to checkout for FREE! You can suggest a title directly in our app and our staff will do their best to add it to our collection!

Check out how to suggest an eBook or eAudiobook directly from our mobile app.

If you don’t already have the cloudLibrary app you can download it for free from your preferred app store! Once it’s downloaded on your device you are ready to let us know what title(s) you’d like us to add to our cloudLibrary collection! 

1) Open your cloudLibrary app (make sure you are logged in) and click on the magnifying glass in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.  Type the title of the book you wish to find in the search bar:

 

2) If we do not have the title, click on “Advanced Search”:

3) This screen will open. Click on “All Library Titles”:

4) Click “Suggestions for Library” and then “Search”:

5) Any available titles will then appear. Locate the title that you would like to suggest, and click “Suggest”:

 

6) That’s it! Your suggestion will be received and considered for purchase by library staff. So go forth and suggest away!

 

Make Your Own Eyepatch For Pirate Day!!!

Celebrate National Talk Like a Pirate Day with Brookens Library! 

To help celebrate we will be hosting a Make Your Own Pirate Eyepatch event:

Wednesday, September 19

11:00 am – 2:00 pm

Student Leadership Center: UIS Student Union

We will have all the supplies you need to take your eyepatch over-the-top! We will also have fun giveaways and a few tasty treats. Don’t miss it!

Meet the Team: Justin

Name: Justin

Major: Information Systems Security

Status: Senior

What is your favorite thing about being a student at UIS? My favorite thing about UIS is the personal connection you make with your professors. They know you by name, where at other schools you usually are just a number. This is also noticeable with online classes as well. The professor is able to give much more attention to their students despite not having a physical presence

What are your goals for the semester? One of my goals for this semester is to not procrastinate on my homework. Waiting until the last minute on homework just causes stress and I’d like to avoid that. I’d also like to learn the programming language known as Python. I’ve heard that it can be very beneficial to learn it when looking for careers.

If there were a reality TV show of your life, what would it be called? Why? If a TV show was made about my life it would be called “How Much Star Wars is Too Much?” I love Star Wars, so I spend a lot of my time reading books, watching movies/TV shows, and playing games about Star Wars. Empire Strikes Back is the Best!

Are you involved in any clubs/activities/sports on campus? Or what are your hobbies?  I’m part of the Computer Science Club here on campus where I have participated in several cybersecurity competitions known as the NCL with our team. We’ve even placed 6th nationally. I am also involved in an organization on campus called Young Americans for Liberty, a political activism organization that fights for free speech and constitutionalism.

What have you learned since working at the library? One thing that I have learned while working at the library is to never be afraid to ask for help. If you ask for help, most often you can accomplish whatever it is much quicker. Finding a book in the library can be confusing and could potentially take a very long time, so just asking for our help is much quicker.

What are your post-graduation plans? After graduation I plan to go strait into the workforce. Ideally I’d like to work at a local business in their tech department for a while but then I’d like to work for the FBI. Also, I plan to try and get several certifications in my field.

What is your favorite thing from the library of things collection?: My favorite thing in the Library of Things Collection is the board games. Can’t go wrong with fun and games with friends!