Award Recognition: Employees with 30 Years of Service

This morning the University recognized employees who have worked for UIS for 10 or more years for their service. The Library is proud to have two employees celebrated this year: Joanne, Senior Library Specialist (Serials), and Tom, University Archivist, have both worked at Brookens Library for 30 years. Today we honor and thank them for their commitment to the UIS (or SSU) ideals and in their service to our campus community. Here are brief tributes read at the ceremony this morning:

Joanne

On Joanne’s first day, December 1st, 1986, she recalls that campus consisted of the Brookens Building, the PAC, as well as a few temporary buildings that made up Sangamon State University.  She began at the Brookens Library in the Technical Services Department and with a few job shifts along the way, it is still where she currently works. When she started, there was a card catalog for searching and the Brookens library collection consisted of mostly print journals and books with a small collection of a few other media types.

Today, she now works at the University of Illinois Springfield, and there has been a few more buildings added to the campus. The card catalog in the Brookens library is just a memory. The print journals have drastically been replaced with their online versions, as well as electronic books and streaming video have become more prevalent as well. Joanne has been a vital part of the Technical Services team throughout the years. She has seen a lot of changes here at the Brookens library and when asked about her time here she will say, “I love libraries, and I’ve met some really terrific people along the way.” Thank you Joanne, for your many years of dedicated service.

Tom

“There’s a really great variety of material to work with here, from 200 year old records to new digital records, and everything in between.” Thomas J. Woods, 2017

Tom was born and spent his formative years in Mount Carmel, Illinois, about 3 ½ hours SE of Springfield. He earned two Masters degrees from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; one in History, the other in Library and Information Science. In his thirty years here on campus, he has been at the forefront of collecting the history of the institution as it has progressed. When Tom started work in 1986 at what was then Sangamon State University, founding president Dr. Robert Spencer was still teaching here, as were many of the charter faculty who had been hired in the early 1970s. He has also documented the physical changes on campus; he remembers when the corn fields started just south of where the colonnade is now.  The UIS Archives holds administration files that have long term value, but it also preserves photographs, student newspapers, audio files, and video of commencements, special events, and visiting speakers. The Archives has a collection of over 5000 student Master projects and theses. Tom handles historical documents such as records of birth, death, and marriage certificates, and Lincoln-era court cases. He has overseen major digitization projects, including a multi-year project preserving and digitizing more than 20 years of oral history interviews with people from all walks of life, such as former prisoners of war, farmers, coal miners, Illinois politicians, and others.  

He has adapted to changing collection and archival standards, as well as innovations in information technology. Focusing not just on collecting and preserving, Tom also works with researchers, students, families seeking genealogy assistance, and more. In the Archives alongside Tom, you’ll also find an archival library assistant, a graduate assistant, and two Illinois Regional Archives Depository (IRAD) interns. Working with, and training students and interns has been very rewarding and over 30 years, Tom has seen a rotating cast of talented people. While he is sad to see them go, he does enjoy seeing them succeed in professional jobs in archives, libraries, museums, and teaching positions.

When not working in the archives, it’s no surprise that Tom would enjoy the opposite – the great outdoors – and exploring natural and historical sites around central Illinois and beyond. He also enjoys reading and listening to music, and playing in trivia tournaments. If you want to know more about any of the previously mentioned items, stop by the Archives, located on the lower level of Brookens Library, and chat with Tom, or visit the archives website. Congratulations to Tom on his 30 years on our campus and for his dedication to collecting, preserving and sharing the history of our university.

 

Getting Started with our eBook Platform: Cloud Library

Cloud Library is an App that gives you access to our Ebook and eAudioBook Collections.  You can download popular reading materials to take with you on-the-go! Getting started is easy. We have included step-by-step instructions to get Cloud Library on your device:

Cloud Library Brookens Library App

Downloading and Logging In
1.        Download the Cloud Library App from your app store.
2.        Log into the app
a.        Select Illinois
b.        University of Illinois Springfield
c.        And enter your Library ID number: (NOT YOUR UIN NUMBER) – This is the barcode number on your card.

Borrowing Books
1.     You can browse books or search by title/author
2.        Once you’ve selected a book you’d like to read. Tap on the cover and then tap “Borrow”
3.        The book will now download to your device and will be available in your account for 14 days.
4.        To get to your book from the browse screen, tap the menu icon and tap “My Books”

Returning Books
1.        Tap the Menu icon  in the top left-hand side
2.        Tap “My Books”
3.        Press and hold the book you’d like to return
4.        Tap “Return”
5.        Tap “Yes”

MENU FEATURES:
Featured: Includes titles we are featuring around a theme or titles that are new to the collection.

Browse: This view allows you to browse the entire collection and filter it by genre.

My Books: This is where you will find the book you currently have checked out, on hold, have previously checked out, and/or have flagged.
Settings: Here you can adjust your contact information and adjust app settings such as whether or not items can be downloaded using cellular data.

Filters: Filters let you decide what you want to see when your search.  You can limit to ebook only or
audiobook only as well as decide if you want to search only what is currently available for checkout, what the library currently owns, or every title in the systems including those not owned by the library that are available to recommend.

April Student and Staff Picks

Check out April’s Book Picks complied by student employee Mac and Faculty Librarian John Laubersheimer.  We have pulled the books from this list and set up a display near the front of the Library on the Level 2 (Main Floor). Stop by and check one out today!

Mac, a Student Worker

Mac’s Picks

  1. Mindfulness by Ellen Langer
  2. The Basic Works of Aristotle by Aristotle
  3. Man’s Search for Meaning: an Introduction to Logotherapy by Viktor E. Frankl
  4. Always Running: La Vida Loca, Gang Days in L.A. by Luis J. Rodriguez
  5. The Little Brown Handbook by H. Ramsey Fowler and Jane E. Aaron
  6. The Plague by Stuart Gilbert
  7. The Martian by Andy Weir
  8. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
  9. The Giver by Lois Lowry
  10. Lord of the Flies: a Novel by William Golding
  11. The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
  12. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  13. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  14. Love You Forever by Robert Munsch and Sheila McGraw
  15. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling
  16. The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
  17. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
  18. Under the Blood-red Sun by Graham Salisbury
  19. The Lord of the Rings Collection by J.R.R. Tolkien
  20. Sabriel by Garth Nix
  21. Divergent by Veronica Roth
  22. American Gods by Neil Gaiman

 

John, a librarianJohn’s Picks

  1. Byzantium: the Apogee by John Julius Norwich
  2. Guns, Germs, and Steel: the Fates of Human Societies by Jared Diamond
  3. Everything Bad is Good for You: How’s Today’s Popular Culture is Actually Making us Smarter by Steven Johnson
  4. Understanding Comics: the Invisible Art by Scott McCloud
  5. Amazing Fantastic Incredible: a Marvelous Memoir by Stan Lee, Peter David, and Colleen Doran
  6. The Absolute Sandman by Neil Gaiman
  7. Twenty Thousand League Under the Sea by Jules Verne
  8. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  9. 2001: a Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
  10. The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
  11. Heart of Darkness and Other Tales by Joseph Conrad
  12. The Once and Future King by T.H. White
  13. The Hitchhiker’s Trilogy by Douglas Adams
  14. The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
  15. Grendel by John Gardner
  16. Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
  17. The Physics of Star Trek by Lawrence M. Krauss
  18. A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
  19. The Way Things Work by David Macaulay and Neil Ardley
  20. The Truth About Chernobyl by Grigori Medvedev
  21. A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin
  22. Car Talk Classics: No Factory Recalls. So Far. by Tom Magliozzi
  23. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling

Library Bill of Rights: Article l

It’s National Library Week, April 9-15!

People often don’t know much about the work that libraries do, or that there is a Library Bill of Rights. That’s right, we have our own guiding principles that help determine how we serve our patrons and communities. We hope you learn a little big more of our library, our librarians and the Library Bill of Rights during National Library Week.

Over the next 7 days, the Faculty at Brookens Library will be sharing a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. Each of the points we’ll be discussing come with their own special challenges and obstacles. Point 1 is no exception:

The Library Bill of Rights (LBR), or as it was originally named, Library’s Bill of Rights, of the American Library Association “serves as the library profession’s interpretation of how the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution applies to libraries” (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, p. xix). Specifically related to the First Amendment, the LBR interprets how “the freedom of speech, or of the press” applies to library practices. The ALA interprets these freedoms broadly to include intellectual freedom, “a freedom of the mind, a personal liberty and a prerequisite for all freedoms [End Page 42] leading to action.” Intellectual freedom is “the bulwark of our constitutional republic . . . [and] . . . the rallying cry of those who struggle for democracy worldwide,” according to the ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Manual, the official interpretive document and guide on implementing the LBR within the context of US libraries (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, pp. xvii–xviii). (Reexamining the Origins of the Adoption of the ALA’s Library Bill of Rights, p. 1)

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

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WEEK 1

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

The Library Bill of Rights can be thought of as a sort of Hippocratic Oath for librarians. Obviously, the circumstances surrounding a typical librarian’s day to day activity limit our chances to do actual, physical harm – sudden shelf collapses and the adventures medical librarians get up to being notable exceptions. However, as drivers of collections and stewards of information, librarians can have quite an impact on the populations we serve on other ways. Most notably, in terms of access to information.

Our patrons are largely dependent on librarians to create and maintain the collections they use. Though many libraries give their patrons the option of requesting things to be added to the collections, the bulk of the collecting is done by professional librarians. Point one of the Library Bill of Rights places this part of the patron/librarian relationship front and center. It is a commitment to intellectual freedom on our patrons’ behalf. It is also a reminder to librarians to not let our own ideas about ‘proper’ reading material warp our collection.

While this point doesn’t meant that librarians are morally or ethically obligated to include hate speech (for example) in our collections, it does mean that we need to be mindful of our own biases in a general sense. In the past, librarians have had some practices that could be, generously, called shortsighted – even if they were well-intentioned. Specifically, I’m talking about the long history librarians have of self-righteous readers advisory and collections activities.

Briefly speaking, at various points in the history of libraries, certain types of information have been privileged over others. The idea being that librarians were the ideal group of people to determine the relative intellectual value of the items in the library’s collection. In the 20’s and 30’s this meant that nonfiction was overwhelmingly given center stage. It also led to some fairly embarrassing ideas about matching patron types to books in other eras. I have vivid memories of an old library text book on readers advisory that advised librarians to suggest Crime and Punishment as ideal reading material for their patrons that looked like they might be sort who needed the reminder.

At the end of the day, it’s not the place of the librarian to make these sort of deep cutting judgement calls. Librarians have a great amount of potential to influence our patrons, but our collections are just not the right way to exert that power. In the face of the sheer amount of information available today, it is also not an effective strategy. It artificially holds librarians into a very narrow collection focus and, arguably, reduces the effectiveness and usefulness of our collections. It’s much more efficient to teach out patrons how to do that for their own individual needs.

John Laubersheimer, Clinical Assistant Professor/Instructional Services Librarian

March Student and Staff Book Picks

March is here and so is our student and staff book picks! This month the CINRC team, comprised of Colleen, Leadership Lived Experience (LLE) student employee and Pamela Salela, Associate Professor and Coordinator, Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center, chose a mixture of classics and new books inspired by Women’s History Month.  We hope you discover something on this list to enjoy!

Colleen, a student workerColleen’s Picks

  1. Once Upon a Quinceañera: Coming of Age in the USA by Julia Alvarez
  2. Start Something That Matters by Blake Mycoskie
  3. Latino USA: A Cartoon History by Ilan Stavans
  4. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  5. The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
  6. Trampling of the Weeds by Lajuanda Lilease
  7. Rhythm and Booze: Poems by Julie Kane
  8. Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson
  9. Love, Dishonor, Marry, Die, Cherish, Perish: A Novel by David Rakoff
  10. Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple
  11. Yes, Please by Amy Poehler
  12. Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
  13. Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates
  14. The Empathy Exams: Essays by Leslie Jamison
  15. Echo by Pam Muñoz Ryan
  16. Barbara the Slut and Other People by Lauren Holmes
  17. It’s Okay to Laugh by Nora McInerny Purmort
  18. You’ll Grow Out of It by Jessi Klein
  19. Almost Famous Women by Megan Mayhew Bergman
  20. Is Everyone Hanging out Without Me (and Other Concerns) by Mindy Kaling

Pamela Salela, a librarianPamela Salela’s Picks

  1. Into That Darkness: From Mercy Killing to Mass Murder by Gitta Sereny
  2. Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl
  3. Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil by Hannah Arendt
  4. Acts of Faith: The Story of an American Muslim, the Struggle for the Soul of a Generation by Eboo Patel
  5. The Master Butchers Singing Club by Louise Erdrich
  6. Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction and the Meaning of Liberty by Dorothy Roberts
  7. Wake up Little Susie: Single Pregnancy and Race Before Roe v. Wade by Rickie Solinger
  8. Night by Elie Wiesel
  9. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
  10. The Truth About Stories: A Native Narrative by Thomas King
  11. Phenomenal Women: Four Poems Celebrating Women by Maya Angelou
  12. Crazy Brave: a Memoir by Joy Harjo
  13. Stones from the River by Ursula Hegi
  14. The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri
  15. Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson
  16. The Bonesetter’s Daughter by Amy Tan
  17. The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
  18. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  19. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
  20. Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett
  21. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
  22. The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

Suggest eBooks to Add To Our Collection!

How to make book suggestions for the Cloud Library collection:

Did you know that you can make suggestions for books you would like for us to purchase in our Cloud Library Collection (Cloud Library is the App where you can access our eBook and eAudioBook collections)? You absolutely can! But we’ll admit, figuring out how to locate books in the app that are available to suggest for purchase can be a little tricky. So here are some step-by-step instructions to show you how.

Start by opening the app, and tapping the 3 blue lines in the top left hand corner to open the menu, and tap Filters.

suggestimage1

This will take you to the options for how your searches are filtered. The app defaults to only search titles already owned by the library. To see all of the titles available in the Cloud Library system, tap Suggestions for Library. Now when searching you will see titles that the library owns, as well as items that are available for us to add to collection.

 

 

 

 

 

suggestimage2

Now you’re ready to search. To search for a book, tap the magnifying glass icon in the top right of the screen. And type in your title where it says Enter search criteria.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

suggestimage3

If the book you are looking for is available to suggest to the library you will see it in the results list, with a blue Suggest button next to it. This collection has both eBooks and eAudiobooks. You’ll know if the item is an audiobook if there is a headphones icon in the bottom right of the cover image for the book. Be sure that you’re suggesting the format you’d prefer when both are available. When we purchase a book that you have suggested, an automatic hold will be placed on it for you. You have 5 days to check out an item before the hold expires.

 

 

suggestimage4

It is important to us that this collection of popular fiction and nonfiction, has the titles that you want to read. While we can’t guarantee we’ll buy every suggestion we receive, we certainly prioritize them when buying new items for the collection.

If you’re not yet familiar with the Cloud Library collection, learn more about how to download the free app here. You’ll need an active library account with Brookens to set up your account.

As always, if you have any questions please feel free to ask for help at the main desk.

March Movie Madness is BACK!

March Movie Madness is back at Brookens Library!! We have put together a March Madness inspired bracket featuring 90’s era films to tie in with the Springfest theme. We have some epic matchup’s this week: Titanic vs. Office Space, Clueless vs. Ghost, Space Jam vs. A League of Their Own! We can’t wait to see who survives Week 1.

Week One March Movie Madness Matchups

Simply visit: http://libguides.uis.edu/marchmadness17 and vote for your favorite 90’s film. It’s that easy! The final week of voting we will have a drawing for a Brookens Library prize pack.

Vote today!