Hidden Gem: Women and the Law

With so many resources at the library, it’s impossible to know about all the awesome and unique collections available. So, we’re highlighting some of our favorite lesser known collections in our Hidden Gems series.  These are collections that are tucked away in larger library resources that you may not know exist. 

This installment of the hidden gems series also comes from the HeinOnline legal database, and would be of interest to researchers of women and gender studies, history, sociology, anthropology, public policy, etc.  To access these works, go to the HeinOnline database, and choose “Women and the Law (Peggy)” under the Browse Database by Name menu.   

Screenshot of HeinOnline database indicating the list of collections under the Browse Database by Name category.

This collection brings together books, biographies and periodicals dedicated to the role of women in society and the law. This unique collection of materials provides a convenient platform for users to research the progression of women’s roles and rights in society over the past 200 years. Also included are more than 70 titles from Emory University Law School’s Feminism and Legal Theory Project which provide a platform to view the effect of law and culture on women. This valuable resource for women and gender studies, history, anthropology, and sociology contains over 2,000 titles with almost a million pages of information on these topics.  Some of the subtopics or subjects include abortion; the feminism and legal theory project; legal rights & suffrage; women & education; women & employment; and women & society among others.  

Hidden Gem: Black Panther Newspaper

With so many resources at the library, it’s impossible to know about all the awesome and unique collections available. So, we’re highlighting some of our favorite lesser known collections in our Hidden Gems series.  These are collections that are tucked away in larger library resources that you may not know exist.

The Black Thought and Culture database – a hidden gem on its own FULL of hidden gems – is an invaluable tool for African American studies and History alike.  Within it is a run of the Black Panther Newspaper (also known as The Black Panther Intercommunal News Service) from 1967 to 1980.  To get to this resource, mouse-over ‘Browse’ from the top menu and select ‘Black Panther Newspaper’ from the drop-down menu.

The Black Panther was the official newspaper of the Black Panther Party for over a decade. It started out as a four-page newsletter in Oakland, California in 1967 and was founded by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale. It’s a tremendously valuable resource for understanding the issues of the day from the perspective of the Black Panther Party. The newspaper distributed information about the party’s activities and expressed the ideology of the Black Panther Party.  The paper focused on international revolutions as inspiration and contemporary racial struggles of African Americans across the United States.

Crucially, each issue present is a high-quality scan of the original document – not just a simple text transcription (though some of those are included as well).  This preserves much of the context the articles existed in and provides an amazing look at the time period these papers were originally published in.

If you need assistance in accessing or searching library resources, please contact alibrarian.

Hidden Gem: Slavery in America Collection

With so many resources at the library, it’s impossible to know about all the awesome and unique collections available. So, we’re highlighting some of our favorite lesser known collections in our Hidden Gems series.  These are collections that are tucked away in larger library resources that you may not know exist.   

This week we are featuring another hidden gem within the HeinOnline legal database, the “Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law” collection.  This collection would be of interest to researchers in the areas of history, African American studies, anthropology, sociology, etc.  To access these works, go to the HeinOnline database, and choose “Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law” under the Browse Database by Name menu.   

Screenshot of HeinOnline database indicating the Slavery in America and the World collection under the Browse Database by Name category.

This collection brings together a multitude of essential legal materials totaling over 2,000 primary and secondary source titles on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world. This includes every statute passed by every colony and state on slavery, every federal statute dealing with slavery, and all reported state and federal cases on slavery.  

Beyond statutes and cases, the collection also includes novels, newspapers, poems, songs, speeches, sermons, and slave narratives.  One of the unique items included is the the original copy of the book – “Twelve Years a Slave: Narrative of Solomon Northup, a Citizen of New-York, Kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and Rescued in 1853, from a Cotton Plantation near the Red River, in Louisiana” that was the foundation of the recent motion picture.   

If you need assistance in accessing or searching library resources, please contact a librarian

Hidden Gem: Legal Classics

With so many resources at the library, it’s impossible to know about all the awesome and unique collections available. So, we’re highlighting some of our favorite lesser known collections in our Hidden Gems series.  These are collections that are tucked away in larger library resources that you may not know exist.   

The HeinOnline legal database has a Legal Classics collection contains a wealth of classical legal information and original primary source literature of interest to legal historians and legal scholars. There is a wealth of information for anyone wanting to know the history of a topic such as accounting, education, political science, etc.  For example, “Ye Olden Blue Laws” is a book containing historical background on many Blue laws or Sunday laws. Laws that restrict things like travel on Sundays, may seem outdated, but in some instances are still on the books while being unenforced.  

To access these works, go to the HeinOnline database, and choose “Legal Classics” under the Browse Database by Name menu.  Then click “All Titles” and you can search or browse by author, title, or subject.   

Screenshot of HeinOnline database indicating the list of collections under the Browse Databases by Name category.

This hidden gem of more than 13,000 books with over 8 million pages includes thousands of works from some of the greatest legal minds in history including Joseph Story, Jeremy Bentham, Louis Brandise, Edward Coke, William Blackstone, William Holdsworth, Henry Maine, Federick William Maitland, Frederick Pollock, Benjamin N. Cardozo, and many more. In addition to many classic treatises, this collection also includes rare items that are found in only a handful of libraries around the world.  Subjects include constitutional history, comparative law, and political science.   

For scholars of Abraham Lincoln there are over 30 works including: 

  • Abe Lincoln’s Yarns and Stories – A Complete Collection of the Funny and Witty Anecdotes that Made Lincoln Famous as America’s Greatest Story Teller 
  • Abraham Lincoln, and Other Addresses in England 
  • Abraham Lincoln, Defendant: Lincoln’s Most Interesting Lawsuit 
  • Abraham Lincoln: His Speeches and Writings 
  • Abraham Lincoln: The Lawyer-Statesman 
  • Assassination of Abraham Lincoln 
  • Herndon’s Life of Lincoln: The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln 
  • Lincoln the Lawyer 
  • Lincoln the Litigant 
  • Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858 
  • Reminiscences of the Illinois Bar Forty Years Ago: Lincoln and Douglas as Orators and Lawyers 
  • Site of Lincoln’s Inn.   

If you need assistance in accessing or searching library resources, please contact a librarian

Hidden Gem: Evidence-Based Care Sheets

With so many resources at the library, it’s impossible to know about all the awesome and unique collections available. So, we’re highlighting some of our favorite lesser known collections in our Hidden Gems series.  These are collections that are tucked away in larger library resources that you may not know exist.   

The CINAHL Complete nursing and allied health database contains two hidden gems of particular interest to nursing, but also to anyone wanting more information on health topics such as breast cancer, deep vein thrombosis, or anorexia nervosa.   

Evidence – Based Care Sheets: Go to the CINAHL Complete database. The Evidence-Based Care Sheets are available via a link at the top of the page. 

Screenshot of CINAHL complete database with the link to the Evidence-based care sheets circled.

Evidence-Based Care Sheets are summaries on specific key topics, which are focused on nursing practice. Each evidence-based care sheet incorporates the latest evidence, statistics, research and references on a given topic.   

Quick Lessons: The Quick Lessons, part of the CINAHL Nursing Guide, are clinically organized nursing overviews, with information mapped to the nursing workflow (i.e. description/etiology, signs and symptoms, assessment, treatment goals, red flags, what to tell the patient/patient’s family).  Quick Lessons are available under the “More” pull down menu at the top of the screen. Of specific interest to laypersons will be the “what to tell the patient/patient’s family” section of these resources 

Screenshot of CINAHL database with the link to the Quick Lessons collection listed under more in the top header.

These two sources provide quick authoritative information on diseases and illnesses along with care guidelines. 

If you need assistance in accessing or searching library resources, please contact a librarian

Data, Data, Everywhere

But How Do I Find What I Need?

Brookens Library provides access to a number of resources that contain data and statistics to aid researchers and students.  A vast amount of statistical data is produced by government agencies and freely available. These resources are not highlighted in this post which is focused on those resources to which the library subscribes.  Many of these resources draw upon government information, but provide additional support by summarizing the data, providing additional indexing, or enhanced search functionality. 

The library has six major statistical resources. We’ve highlighted them below with information that will help you determine which source will best meet your needs.  If you need statistics or data, check out these resources, and for assistance with your research, set-up an appointment with a librarian. 

Statistical Abstract of the United States 

Statistical Abstract of the United States provides a comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States, providing a snapshot of America and its people. These summaries also serve to lead users to other sources for more complete data related to their topic. This database has been updated annually by the federal government since 1878.  The Statistical Abstract of the United States is one of the best-known statistical reference publications and serves as both an answer book and a guide to statistical sources. This database Includes 1400+ individually indexed tables (with attached spreadsheets) that are searchable and browsable. 

Historical Statistics of the United States

Historical Statistics of the United States includes statistics about the United States from the colonial times up to the start of the 21st century. It provides U.S. population, economic, employment, governance and international relations data. You can even create and save custom tables.  It has long been the standard source for quantitative indicators of American history. Some of the additional topics include data on American Indians, slavery, outlying areas, poverty, nonprofit organizations, and the Confederate States of America. 

Statistical Insight

This database is designed to find and retrieve statistical content.  It provides access to tables and citations to statistics produced by the U.S. federal, state and local governments, international governmental organizations, and non-governmental organizations. It spans millions of full-text reports and more than 1 million published tables on thousands of different topics. It also offers broad perspectives and insight on long-term national trends and implications paired with the ability to narrow results. Whether you are looking for tables, statistical reports, publication abstracts, or datasets, results are ranked by relevance. Faceted search results can then be filtered by document type, source, date published, geographic area, and more.

Economist Intelligence Unit

The Economist Intelligence Unit is an excellent source for international statistical data especially related to economics, politics, and governmental information.  It provides full-text access to quantitative and qualitative data and forecasts political, economic, and business climates for various regions and up to 200 countries, as well as related news, analysis, and risk factor assessments. This database, produced by the research and analysis division of The Economist Group, was created in 1946 with the purposes of helping businesses, financial firms, and governments to understand how the world is changing and how that creates opportunities to be seized and risks to be managed. 

Sage Business Stats

SAGE Business Stats offers historic, current, and projected demographic and industry data points down to the zip-code level. Users can compare data within one variable or across variables using tables and line graphs; access interactive maps with timelines at the state, county, zip-code, city, and metropolitan statistical area levels; and export charts, graphs, and tables as well as the data itself.

ICPSR: Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research

UIS is an institutional member of the ICPSR which serves as the largest archive and repository of digital social science data. An integral part of the infrastructure of social science research, ICPSR maintains and provides access to a vast archive of social science data for research and instruction (over 8,000 discrete studies/surveys with more than 65,000 datasets).  ICPSR supports students, instructors, researchers, and policy makers who: conduct secondary research to support primary research findings or generate new findings; preserve and disseminate primary research data; study or teach statistical methods in quantitative analysis; and develop funding proposals for grants or contracts that require a data management plan.  ICPSR also encourages deposits of digital data. Deposits are made using a secure data deposit workspace to describe the data collection and upload content.  More information on the depositing of digital data can be found at https://deposit.icpsr.umich.edu/deposit/home.  ICPSR accepts replication datasets for researchers who need to publish their raw data in relation to a journal article, so that other researchers can replicate the findings. Because ICPSR does not approve or alter datasets in any way, studies archived as replication datasets tend to appear on their website more quickly.

Using Library Databases on the Job Hunt

You’ve used library databases for research papers before, but they can also help you as you search for jobs and internships – whether you are trying to find information on potential employers for the Career Connections Expo or want some extra talking points for a scheduled interview.  

If you want to know more about potential employers, and you want to go beyond what you can find on the company’s website and some quick Google searching, here are some suggestions for library resources that can help you get to better know a company. 

Research the companyBusiness Source Complete is a great place to start if looking for a basic overview of a public company (think large companies like Target, Boeing or Accenture). You can usually find a description of the company, financial information and executive biographies. Many profiles include SWOT reports, which summarize the strengths and weaknesses of a business and the opportunities and threats it faces.  

To find a company profile or SWOT analysis, type in the company name in the main search bar and see what pops up in the results. Alternatively, click on “Company Information” in the blue banner at the top and search for your company there. 

Know the industry. If you are planning to work in a specific industry, it can be useful to get to know what trends are driving progress within that sector. Business Source Complete provides free industry reports to help you get to know the top companies, see the market forecast and become familiar with the terminology being used within the industry.  

To find an industry profile, search for the industry and limit your search to the source type of “Industry Profiles.” For example, if you are going to work for a hospital or pharmaceutical company, run a search for “healthcare industry” and find a current industry report among the results for your chosen country.  

Read the news. While you can easily find recent company news on Google, you can also find both national and regional newspapers in the library’s databases. Not all newspapers can be accessed for free on the web so it can be useful to search Brookens Library’s newspaper databases, which include the New York Times and Newspaper Source

If you have any questions about using any of the library’s databases, ask one of our librarians