Banned Books Week 2020

This week, Brookens Library is celebrating Banned Books Week. During the last week of September, libraries across the world celebrate the freedom to read. It brings attention to the censorship of books in libraries and schools in the past and present.

There are many reasons why books can be either challenged or banned. Here are a few examples of books that were banned or challenged and the reasons behind them.

Scary Stories by Alvin Schwartz is a classic spooky book series that many have read around camp fires. However, it was banned for being too scary and its illustrations too gruesome for readers. Elementary school teachers were concerned when children were scared by the book, and it has been challenged by many other schools since for similar reasons. Want to read it? Request the book via I-Share.

An American classic, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain depicts life during the late 1800s and the adventure that Huckleberry Finn goes on. It was banned and challenged by many schools because of the use of racial slurs. Available at Brookens Library.

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury is yet another classic that has been banned and challenged by many schools. Many parents have requested to have it banned because of its use of profanity, and it contains topics about sex, abortion, and suicide. Audiobook available at Brookens Library.

These are only a few reasons why books are banned and challenged around the world. Brookens Library holds many banned and/or challenged books to promote the freedom to read; find a commonly banned eBook to read this week on cloudLibrary.

If you want to learn more about other banned books, check out the links below.

Top 10 Most Challenge Books

Frequently Challenged Books

Banned and Challenged Classics

Banned Books Week

Each year Banned Books Week is honored around the world by librarians, teachers, readers, and many more supporters of the book community. Seeking to shed a light on new and historical attempts to censor books at libraries and schools, Banned Books Week is about standing in support of the right to read and the freedom of information.

Why are books challenged or banned? Well, because someone felt they present voices, content, or ideas that are dangerous and inappropriate. Examples include Where’s Waldo? being challenged due to the image of a woman sunbathing topless . . . while facedown. Or Tango Makes Three, a children’s book about a penguin with two dads that was challenged because parents may find the content distasteful.

The American Library Association maintains a large collection of information about frequently challenged books for anyone to browse and learn from. They also compile yearly statistics about censorship in libraries that have been condensed into this infographic.

Censorship by the Numbers Infographic
Censorship by the Numbers

At Brookens Library, we will be highlighting banned and challenged books in our print and digital collections, as well as spotlighting items on our social media. The library cares about your intellectual freedom and encourages you to take ownership of it. We hope you feel empowered this week to peruse some banned or challenged items at the library and to research and learn about challenges to your right to information.

Top Ten Challenged Books of 2017

It’s Banned Books Week! In 2017, 416 books were challenged or banned. The list includes classic titles such as, To Kill a Mockingbird, popular series such as Harry Potter, as well as some new titles released this past year. Whatever the book, the issue is the same, banning books silences stories, voices, and ideas. To celebrate your right to read, we’re putting the spotlight on some of these stories throughout this week. To start, let’s learn about the Top 10 Challenged books of 2017.

You can check out any of these books at Brookens. Be sure to check our social media channels throughout this week as we Stand for the Banned and continue to highlight

It’s Banned Books Week!

It’s Banned Books Week! A week each year when libraries around the world celebrate the freedom to read – a freedom that can be taken for granted and continues to be challenged. Each year, book are challenged or banned because they present topics, content, ideas, or voices that someone has deemed dangerous or inappropriate. Each of these challenges represents an attempt to censor an author and silence ideas and voices and are a direct threat to our intellectual freedom.

In the State of America’s Libraries 2018 report, intellectual freedom was among the Issues and Trends highlighted because of the increased number of challenges reported. According to the report, Public challenges and bans rose from 45 in 2016 to 91 in 2017. This infographic from the American Library Association provides some additional numbers and information about the state of bans and challenges from 2017.

At Brookens, we care about your freedom to read and work to protect your intellectual freedom. Specifically, this week we’re answering the call put forward with this year’s Banned Books Week theme – Banned Books Silences Stories. Speak Out! – by doing just that, speaking out. We will be highlight books that have been challenged or banned throughout the week across our social media platforms. Additionally, we’ll be providing you with lists of the most challenged books and linking you to those items in our collection. As we share our favorite books and stories about why they matter, we hope you’ll share yours too!

Banned Books Week: Celebrate the Freedom to Read with Brookens Library

ml0a5492_bbw-wbBanned Books Week at Brookens Library

On Saturday Sept. 24th, the National African American and Culture Museum opened in Washington, D.C.   It will stand as a testament to the fortitude of those who refused to be annihilated physically, emotionally and spiritually.   Not only did most African Americans’ ancestors suffer physical bondage, but they also suffered intellectual bondage – denied the right, by law, even to learn to read.   Just this past week Dr. Carla Hayden was sworn in as the first woman and the first African American to serve as the Librarian of Congress – a symbolic of the move from African American ancestral bondage to custodianship of our nation’s intellectual heritage.

So it is fitting that the grand opening coincides with Banned Books Week, where libraries all over the U.S. honor the freedom to read; a right that applies equally to all U.S. citizens.  Please come to Brookens Library and help us celebrate this right that we all enjoy.  During the week of September 25th through October 1st., we will have books on display that have either been banned (in a bygone era) or in more contemporary times –  challenged.  Come take a selfie with your favorite challenged book or share a photo of your book shelf with your favorite challenged books using the hashtags #UISLib #IReadBannedBooks #FreedomToRead.

Share a selfie on Instagram using the hashtag #UISLibBBW and win a pair of our popular clear sunglasses or other great prizes!

Follow UISBrookensLibrary on Instagram.

Beware the Books!

“Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning.

The ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) receives reports from libraries, schools, and the media on attempts to ban books in communities across the country. ALA compiles lists of challenged books in order to inform the public about censorship efforts that affect libraries and schools. – – American Library Association

Like ALA, Brookens Library condemns censorship. Celebrate Banned Books Week with us by picking up a banned or challenged book from our display at the main desk. 

LEARN MORE: http://www.ala.org/advocacy/banned

bannedbooks

Banned Books Week

WHAT IS BANNED BOOKS WEEK?

“Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning.

The ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) receives reports from libraries, schools, and the media on attempts to ban books in communities across the country. ALA compile lists of challenged books in order to inform the public about censorship efforts that affect libraries and schools. – – American Library Association Like ALA, Brookens Library our librarians condemn censorship. Our staff works to ensure free access to information.

LEARN MORE: http://www.ala.org/advocacy/banned

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