How To Tuesday – Study Spots!

As midterms creep up on us all (can you believe it’s October??), we at Brookens Library welcome all patrons to our unique study spaces.

The first floor is not a quiet floor and is perfect for collaborative work. Look at Megan and Taylor having brain blasts!

The library stairwell lounges located on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th floors are also great for collaborative work. We have whiteboards and markers available for you to jot down all your brilliant notes and ideas. These collaborative spaces are also great for working alone if you don’t mind a little background noise.

Quiet study locations are found on the 3rd and 4th floors. When it is time to hunker down and focus on that reading or essay, get comfortable in our quiet and peaceful cubbies and tables.

On our quiet floors there are a few locations like lounges (pictured above) and large tables to also study quietly with friends. Or get into passionate—yet hushed— debates!

Finally, if you are someone who finds that their best work occurs when surrounded by nature, Brookens Library has plenty of tables to sit at outside.

Come seek out your perfect study spot at Brookens Library! Happy learning!

 

Top Ten Challenged Books of 2017

It’s Banned Books Week! In 2017, 416 books were challenged or banned. The list includes classic titles such as, To Kill a Mockingbird, popular series such as Harry Potter, as well as some new titles released this past year. Whatever the book, the issue is the same, banning books silences stories, voices, and ideas. To celebrate your right to read, we’re putting the spotlight on some of these stories throughout this week. To start, let’s learn about the Top 10 Challenged books of 2017.

You can check out any of these books at Brookens. Be sure to check our social media channels throughout this week as we Stand for the Banned and continue to highlight

It’s Banned Books Week!

It’s Banned Books Week! A week each year when libraries around the world celebrate the freedom to read – a freedom that can be taken for granted and continues to be challenged. Each year, book are challenged or banned because they present topics, content, ideas, or voices that someone has deemed dangerous or inappropriate. Each of these challenges represents an attempt to censor an author and silence ideas and voices and are a direct threat to our intellectual freedom.

In the State of America’s Libraries 2018 report, intellectual freedom was among the Issues and Trends highlighted because of the increased number of challenges reported. According to the report, Public challenges and bans rose from 45 in 2016 to 91 in 2017. This infographic from the American Library Association provides some additional numbers and information about the state of bans and challenges from 2017.

At Brookens, we care about your freedom to read and work to protect your intellectual freedom. Specifically, this week we’re answering the call put forward with this year’s Banned Books Week theme – Banned Books Silences Stories. Speak Out! – by doing just that, speaking out. We will be highlight books that have been challenged or banned throughout the week across our social media platforms. Additionally, we’ll be providing you with lists of the most challenged books and linking you to those items in our collection. As we share our favorite books and stories about why they matter, we hope you’ll share yours too!

Movements of the ’60s, Diane Nash Inspired Library Resources

The Movements of the ‘60s: A Legacy for Today, Diane Nash  

Brookens Library is proud to have co-sponsored the ECCE Speaker Series event The Movements of the ‘60s: A Legacy for Today, Diane Nash on Thursday, September 13. To bridge the event with our Collections, Faculty Librarian Nancy Weichert brought a mobile checkout station and a small collection of materials related to Nash’s area of work.  Sarah Sagmoen, Director of User Services & faculty liaison to Necessary Steps, and University Librarian Dean Piotrowski also participated in the event.

Diane Nash’s involvement in the nonviolent movement began in 1959 when she was a student at Fisk University. In 1960, she became the chairperson of the student sit-in movement in Nashville – the first southern city to desegregate its lunch counters – as well as one of the founding students of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee. She coordinated the Freedom Ride from Birmingham, Alabama to Jackson, Mississippi in 1961. Her arrests for civil rights activities culminated in Nash being imprisoned for 30 days in 1961, while she was pregnant with her first child. Undeterred, she went on to join a national committee—to which she was appointed by President John F. Kennedy—that promoted passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Nash later became active in the peace movement that worked to end the Vietnam War, and became an instructor in the philosophy and strategy of non-violence as developed by Mohandas Gandhi.
(source)

A Selection of Online Library Resources Available Through Brookens

The African-American Years: Chronologies of American History and Experience

Discusses the history of African Americans from pre-colonial times to the present. Includes memoirs, letters, family histories, newspapers, oral histories, and city directories, providing historical evidence to help understand and interpret past events.

Black Thought and Culture 

1,303 sources with 1,210 authors, covering the non-fiction published works of leading African Americans. Where possible the complete published non-fiction works are included, as well as interviews, journal articles, speeches, essays, pamphlets, letters and other fugitive material.

Black Studies in Video

Featuring award-winning documentaries, newsreels, interviews and archival footage surveying the evolution of black culture in the United States. Includes films covering history, politics, art and culture, family structure, social and economic pressures, and gender relations

America History & Life

Published since 1964, this is the definitive bibliographic reference covering the history, culture, area studies, and current affairs literature of the United States and Canada, from prehistory to the present.

Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000 

Organized around the history of women in social movements in the U.S. between 1600 and 2000, this collection seeks to advance scholarly debates and understanding about U.S. women’s history
The collection currently includes 125 document projects and archives with more than 5,100 documents and 175,000 pages of additional full-text documents, written by 2,800 primary authors. It also includes book, film, and website reviews, notes from the archives, and teaching tools.

The Sixties: Primary Documents and Personal Narratives 1960 – 1974

Brings the 1960s alive through diaries, letters, autobiographies and other memoirs, written and oral histories, manifestos, government documents, memorabilia, and scholarly commentary. With 125,000 pages of text and 50 hours of video at completion, this searchable collection is the definitive electronic resource for students and scholars researching this important period in American history, culture, and politics.

 

A selection of Print Library Resources Available Through Brookens

Freedom riders: 1961 and the struggle for racial justice by Raymond Arsenault
Black revolt; strategies of protest by Doris Yvonne Wilkinson
Strategies for freedom: the changing patterns of black protest by Bayard Rustin
Black protest in the sixties by August Meier
The lost dream of equality: critical essays on education and social class by Alan Scott
Women and the civil rights movement, 1954-1965 by Davis Houck
Living through the civil rights movement by Charles George
Voices of freedom: an oral history of the civil rights movement from the 1950s through the 1980s by Henry Hampton
The origins of nonviolence: Tolstoy and Gandhi in their historical settings by Martin Burgress Green
Many minds, one heart: SNCC’s dream for a new America by Wesley Hogan
Teaching peace: nonviolence and the liberal arts by Denny Wever

 

A selection of Films Available Through Brookens

Reflections unheard: black women in civil rights by Yello Kat Productions
Freedom riders by American Experience
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Natalie Bullock Brown
Ghandi by Hartwick Classic Film
Freedom bound by Harvey Richards
We’ll never turn back by Harvey Richards

How To Suggest an eBook or eAudiobook in cloudLibrary!

Did you know we have THOUSANDS of eBooks & eAudiobooks in cloudLibrary? It’s true! However, there may be an eBook or eAudiobook that we don’t have that you would like to checkout for FREE! You can suggest a title directly in our app and our staff will do their best to add it to our collection!

Check out how to suggest an eBook or eAudiobook directly from our mobile app.

If you don’t already have the cloudLibrary app you can download it for free from your preferred app store! Once it’s downloaded on your device you are ready to let us know what title(s) you’d like us to add to our cloudLibrary collection! 

1) Open your cloudLibrary app (make sure you are logged in) and click on the magnifying glass in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.  Type the title of the book you wish to find in the search bar:

 

2) If we do not have the title, click on “Advanced Search”:

3) This screen will open. Click on “All Library Titles”:

4) Click “Suggestions for Library” and then “Search”:

5) Any available titles will then appear. Locate the title that you would like to suggest, and click “Suggest”:

 

6) That’s it! Your suggestion will be received and considered for purchase by library staff. So go forth and suggest away!

 

How-To-Tuesday: Double Feature!

The beginning of the 2018-2019 Academic Year can only mean one thing: The return of How-To-Tuesdays or HTT!

This week you are in for a treat, a HTT double feature! We will help you learn how to find the library during the Main Floor Renovation project & how to create your Library Account online!

First up is How to Find the Library:

Now that you know how to find us in person, let’s optimize your online experience by learning how to Create Your MyLibrary Account:

 

New Resources in the Library

We have made several new acquisitions to support faculty and students for the new school year:

SPORTDiscus with Full Text is the definitive research tool for all areas of sports and sports medicine literature. The database provides access to full text for 550 journals in the areas of sports and sports medicine journals. This authoritative file contains full text for many of the most used journals in the database with no embargo and full-text coverage dating back to 1985. The library also upgraded its subscription to CINAHL Complete providing full text from almost 700 additional journals. CINAHL Complete includes indexing from an additional two thousand journals providing two million more records. The subscription includes continuing education modules, evidence-based care sheets, quick lessons providing overviews of disease and conditions, and information on research instruments.

The DSM Library provides electronic full text to the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition) as well as several other supporting works including: DSM-5® Handbook of Differential Diagnosis, DSM-5® Clinical Cases, and the Spanish Edition of the Desk Reference to the Diagnostic Criteria From DSM-5®. This critical reference work is now available online full text and available 24×7 for use by both on ground and online students.

American Antiquarian Society (AAS): The AAS Historical Periodicals Collection, Series 1 – 5 – American Antiquarian Society is seen as the premier library documenting the life of America’s people from the Colonial Era through the Civil War and Reconstruction. This database series provides digital access to the most comprehensive collection of American periodicals published between 1684 and 1912. You can search all years or limit to a particular series broken up by date. This important database of primary source materials will benefit history, political science, women studies, marketing or any discipline looking for information on the United stated from 1691 through 1877.

American Chemical Society: The collection of 100 e-books from the American Chemical Society primarily focused on new teaching methodologies and environmental science with titles such as Teaching and the Internet, Climate Change Literacy and Education, Liberal Arts Strategies for the Chemistry Classroom, and Environmental Chemistry: Undergraduate and Graduate Classroom, Laboratory, and Local Community Learning Experiences, as well as many others.

Physchotherapy.net: The 100+ educational media titles have been added with concentration in the areas of psychology, counseling, and social work areas. Titles available from this source include: Stages of Change for Addictions, Child Therapy Case Consultation, Emotionally Focused Therapy with Same-Sex Couples, and Legal & Ethical Issues for Mental Health Professionals, plus many more.