Midterms Drop-In Research Help

Drop in and get help with your research! No appointment needed.

Sundays: 4 – 7pm
Mondays–Thursdays: 10 am – noon, 2 – 8pm

Brookens Library is offering drop-in research help for the next two weeks to give you some extra assistance with any midterm research project you might be working on. Stop by the Brookens Library Main Level and get help with your research from one of our librarians all week long.

Our librarians can help you with a variety of research needs, including finding scholarly sources for a paper, developing your research topic, or tracking down a hard-to-find citation, etc.

If none of these times work, you can also schedule an appointment with a librarian. Get step-by-step directions here.

Drop-In Research Help Flyer.

How to Print at Brookens

This week’s How-To Tuesday focuses on how to print your papers and documents at Brookens Library.

The new semester has begun and everyone is getting back into the swing of things. That means papers and other assignments are going to be due soon, so a lot of you are going to need to know how to print at Brookens.

STEP 1: The first thing you will need to do is to log into any computer. If you’re not a UIS student, you will need to get a temporary login username and password at the main desk.

STEP 2: The next thing you need to do is to pull up your document on a computer. It can be anything from essays, graphs, or even pictures.

STEP 3: Once you pull up what you need to print you can hit CRTL + P on your keyboard to print or you can go to the setting tab of any browser and find the print option there. Whichever way works for you.

STEP 4: Now once you press the print button a textbox will appear on the screen. You will then have to name your print job. Make sure it’s something you can remember and that’s not too common so other people won’t name their print job that too.

STEP 5: After that you go to the printing station and swipe your i-card at the computer that is there.

Printing Station at Brookens Library
Printing Station at Brookens Library

STEP 6: Then finally, a list of names will appear. Click on the one you named, and then click print. Whatever you wanted printed will print out shortly.

Printer at Brookens Library
Printer at Brookens Library

That is how to print at Brookens Library! If you have any questions about the process of printing or need any help with it, please ask someone at the main desk.

How to Request Items

How-To Tuesdays are back with the new semester to give you a quick refresher on all things Brookens after your summer break!

This week Taylor can’t find the obscure book she wants at Brookens. How will she survive? With I-Share, of course!

See a book that you would like to request for pickup at Brookens Library? This brief tutorial will show you how to request items from I-Share libraries and have them sent to you!

If you have any questions, contact the library main desk and someone will help you.

Welcome Back!

On behalf of Brookens Library, we’d like to welcome you back and wish you a successful fall semester! Hopefully, you had a relaxing or productive summer.  Here at the Library we have been busy over the summer getting ready for Academic Year 2019-20 and have a number of informational items we would like everyone to be aware of.

Course Materials, Reserves, and Streaming Media
The Library is operating under a budget reduced by 10% this year.  We’ve taken steps to ensure that our services and our resources will not be unduly affected by this situation.  If you have materials you need to place on reserve or otherwise need for your courses, be sure to get those requests in as soon as possible.  This includes articles, books, and especially streaming movies. This past spring, we ran out of funds for our streaming movie service to the detriment of faculty who had included materials in their syllabus that we were not aware of. If you intend to use film or streaming media in your class, please reach out to your subject liaison ASAP to ensure you will have access to required resources for your course. Sharing your syllabus with your librarian liaison is also beneficial.

Use of Subscription Resources
Speaking of Library resources, the Library currently subscribes to more than 100 online databases and related resources to support scholarship and research across all disciplines at UIS.  Some of our largest database subscriptions include:

  • IEEE: Full-text access to technical literature in electrical engineering, computer science, and electronics.
  • Academic Search Complete: a multidisciplinary database containing full-text articles from peer reviewed journals, popular magazines and newspapers.
  • Web of Science: the world’s most trusted citation indexes for scientific and scholarly research.

The Library relies heavily on usage statistics in order to monitor the health of our collection and to be good stewards of the money entrusted to us by the University.  To that end, we ask that if you are assigning an article from any of our many resources that, whenever possible, you link to the article in question rather than use a pdf.  This is especially important for those of you who use Blackboard to organize your courses.

Instruction: Meeting Learning Outcomes for Baccalaureate Education and Student Success
We would like to remind everyone that the Librarians are available for library/information literacy instruction in your classes, or scheduled as extra-credit workshops.  Librarians can provide instruction on a wide variety of topics that will greatly assist student success.  Key information literacy learning objectives can be found through the UIS Goals and Learning Outcomes for Baccalaureate Education and are foundational to student success.  To that end, we offer instructional assistance with traditional, bibliographic instruction (database use, key word selection, topic refinement) to covering advanced research and information use concepts. If you would like to schedule instruction, please fill out the instruction request form.

Consultations = Customized Support for High Impact Practices
Additionally, we offer research consultations for students as well so they can receive customized, one-on-one research support from a Librarian. Consultations do not have to center on an in-depth research assignment, but can be scheduled to support any student who may benefit from additional assistance.

We look forward to working with you all as well as meeting and engaging with your students this semester.  You can read more on our resources and other useful library information on this blog, especially our Hidden Gems series.  There is much more about services for faculty on the Faculty Research Guide.

As always, if you have any questions concerning any of the information in this update, do not hesitate to reach out to any of the Librarians.

Brookens Library, Library Instructional Services Program
John Laubersheimer, Chair

Sally LaJoie

Stephen McMinn

Sarah Sagmoen

Pamela Salela

Hidden Gem: Women and the Law

With so many resources at the library, it’s impossible to know about all the awesome and unique collections available. So, we’re highlighting some of our favorite lesser known collections in our Hidden Gems series.  These are collections that are tucked away in larger library resources that you may not know exist. 

This installment of the hidden gems series also comes from the HeinOnline legal database, and would be of interest to researchers of women and gender studies, history, sociology, anthropology, public policy, etc.  To access these works, go to the HeinOnline database, and choose “Women and the Law (Peggy)” under the Browse Database by Name menu.   

Screenshot of HeinOnline database indicating the list of collections under the Browse Database by Name category.

This collection brings together books, biographies and periodicals dedicated to the role of women in society and the law. This unique collection of materials provides a convenient platform for users to research the progression of women’s roles and rights in society over the past 200 years. Also included are more than 70 titles from Emory University Law School’s Feminism and Legal Theory Project which provide a platform to view the effect of law and culture on women. This valuable resource for women and gender studies, history, anthropology, and sociology contains over 2,000 titles with almost a million pages of information on these topics.  Some of the subtopics or subjects include abortion; the feminism and legal theory project; legal rights & suffrage; women & education; women & employment; and women & society among others.  

Hidden Gem: Black Panther Newspaper

With so many resources at the library, it’s impossible to know about all the awesome and unique collections available. So, we’re highlighting some of our favorite lesser known collections in our Hidden Gems series.  These are collections that are tucked away in larger library resources that you may not know exist.

The Black Thought and Culture database – a hidden gem on its own FULL of hidden gems – is an invaluable tool for African American studies and History alike.  Within it is a run of the Black Panther Newspaper (also known as The Black Panther Intercommunal News Service) from 1967 to 1980.  To get to this resource, mouse-over ‘Browse’ from the top menu and select ‘Black Panther Newspaper’ from the drop-down menu.

The Black Panther was the official newspaper of the Black Panther Party for over a decade. It started out as a four-page newsletter in Oakland, California in 1967 and was founded by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale. It’s a tremendously valuable resource for understanding the issues of the day from the perspective of the Black Panther Party. The newspaper distributed information about the party’s activities and expressed the ideology of the Black Panther Party.  The paper focused on international revolutions as inspiration and contemporary racial struggles of African Americans across the United States.

Crucially, each issue present is a high-quality scan of the original document – not just a simple text transcription (though some of those are included as well).  This preserves much of the context the articles existed in and provides an amazing look at the time period these papers were originally published in.

If you need assistance in accessing or searching library resources, please contact alibrarian.

Hidden Gem: Slavery in America Collection

With so many resources at the library, it’s impossible to know about all the awesome and unique collections available. So, we’re highlighting some of our favorite lesser known collections in our Hidden Gems series.  These are collections that are tucked away in larger library resources that you may not know exist.   

This week we are featuring another hidden gem within the HeinOnline legal database, the “Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law” collection.  This collection would be of interest to researchers in the areas of history, African American studies, anthropology, sociology, etc.  To access these works, go to the HeinOnline database, and choose “Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law” under the Browse Database by Name menu.   

Screenshot of HeinOnline database indicating the Slavery in America and the World collection under the Browse Database by Name category.

This collection brings together a multitude of essential legal materials totaling over 2,000 primary and secondary source titles on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world. This includes every statute passed by every colony and state on slavery, every federal statute dealing with slavery, and all reported state and federal cases on slavery.  

Beyond statutes and cases, the collection also includes novels, newspapers, poems, songs, speeches, sermons, and slave narratives.  One of the unique items included is the the original copy of the book – “Twelve Years a Slave: Narrative of Solomon Northup, a Citizen of New-York, Kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and Rescued in 1853, from a Cotton Plantation near the Red River, in Louisiana” that was the foundation of the recent motion picture.   

If you need assistance in accessing or searching library resources, please contact a librarian