Summer Semester Hours

Today is the first day of the Summer Semester at UIS! We are currently renovating our Main Floor space. The Library remains open, but how you enter changes. You must enter the Library, Media Lab and Archives through the Lower Level Entrance.  Please note, our operating hours change during the Summer Semester:

Summer Library Hours

Mon-Thu: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm
Fri: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Sat: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Sun: 2:00 pm – 9:00 pm

 

How To Find Us During Our Renovation!

We are renovating the Main Floor of Brookens Library, which means the Main Floor Entrances are closed! This video will show you how to enter the library, where you can find elevator access, where various resources will be housed, and how to find the circulation desk over the summer and throughout the duration of the renovation.

For a more complete overview of the project, read this post!

Library Summer Hours:

Spring Intersession (5/12 – 6/3)

Mon-Fri: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Sat-Sun: Closed

Memorial Day (5/28): CLOSED
Summer Hours (6/4 – 7/27)

Mon-Thur: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm

Fri: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Sat: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Sun: 2:00 pm  – 9:00 pm

Independence Day (6/4): CLOSED
Summer Intersession: (7/28 – 8/25)

Mon-Fri: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Sat-Sun: Closed

 

Author Pamela Bannos To Speak at UIS June 7, 2018

We are pleased to announce the 2018 Friends of Brookens Library Annual Dinner speaker: Pamela Bannos, author of Vivian Maier: A Photographer’s Life and Afterlife.

The Annual Dinner will take place on Thursday, June 7, 2018 in the UIS Student Union Ballroom. A cash bar & book exchange kicks off the evening, from 5:30 – 6:00, with the meeting and dinner beginning at 6:00. Guest speaker Pamela Bannos will begin her discussion of her book Vivian MaierA Photographer’s Life and Afterlife, immediately following, at 7:00 pm. Tickets to the dinner are $30 for Friends members and $35 for non-members. All guests are welcome! Proceeds from the evening will be used to advance the initiatives of Brookens Library at the University of Illinois Springfield.

While the dinner is a ticketed event, the discussion led by guest speaker Pamela Bannos, is free and open to the public! To reserve your ticket to the dinner, please contact Bethany Burbridge Stremmel at bburb2@uis.edu. To attend the discussion, please arrive a few minutes before 7:00 pm.

Pamela Bannos is an artist and researcher who utilizes methods that highlight the forgotten and overlooked, exploring the links between visual representation, urban space, history, and collective memory. She has exhibited her work nationally and internationally, including in solo exhibitions at the Photographers’ Gallery in London, England, and the Edwynn Houk Gallery in New York. Her research projects include an investigation of Chicago’s Lincoln Park and the grounds of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. Bannos has taught photography in Northwestern University’s Department of Art Theory and Practice – http://vivianmaierproject.com/

Library Student Managers: A Fond Farewell!

 As we complete another academic year, we are also marking the end of an era for our Student Management team: Andrew, Diamond, and Taylor.  What makes this year unique is that all three of our Student Managers are graduating. We want to take this moment to say an extra special congratulations and an extra special thank you to each of them.  

The library’s Student Managers are members of our User Services team, which means they are fully trained circulation supervisors.  They open and close the library, train new student employees, provide excellent service to our patrons, plan and run student employee staff meetings and our biannual semester retreats, and so much more.  Each of them comes to work every day ready to work hard, to make a positive impact, and they’re always ready for the weirdly unexpected and unpredictable issues that can arise with each day.  They are thoughtful and responsible, and provide a much needed student voice to every decision we make in the User Services department.  

As a team, they are both colleagues and friends who support each other inside and outside the library.  It has been an honor and a privilege to watch them grow as leaders, and a true joy to work alongside them.  We are better because of them, the library is better because of them, and for that, we will be forever grateful.  

Andrew, Diamond, and Taylor – Thank you for letting us be a part of your time at UIS, it has been unforgettable. We can’t wait to see what you do next!  

Diamond: Student Manager
Taylor: Student Manager

 

Andrew: Student Manager

Special Thanks and Congratulations from User Services, 

Erich, Student Assistant Program Coordinator  and Sarah, Director of Learning Commons and User Services

Privacy Week: 3 Reasons Why Your Passwords Are Bad and How to Fix Them

Many of us entrust companies that sell products online with our addresses, credit card numbers, and bank information. While the security on their end is dependent upon them, there are some things we can do to prevent malicious users from accessing our data. One of the most basic security devices we use on a daily basis is a password. A password is like the key to a door, the more complex it is the more difficult it is to enter unauthorized. Here are some common mistakes when it comes to creating passwords:

  1. It’s way too short!
    • 13+ characters at all times people. Do you know how long it takes to crack the 10 letter password “mynamejeff” in 2018? Roughly 3 months, if you change it to “mynamejeff2” the cracking time will jump to roughly 2 centuries. But just to be future proof you should go a bit further. Make it a 13-character password, “mynamejeff222”. Now it will take roughly 369 millennia to crack that bad boy!

black and white spinning clock hands

  1. You don’t test your passwords
    • There are plenty of sites online that will show you just how long it takes to crack your password. One such site is https://www.betterbuys.com/estimating-password-cracking-times/. You can see the estimated amount of time to crack your password as well as see how long it would of taken in 1992 for example.

Password strangeth bar going from fair to good to strong as more characters are typed.

  1. You use dictionary words
    • Sorry but even though the word skateboard has 10 letters, it will still be cracked in less than a second. Hackers check all words with meaning first before they start making random guesses. Lucky us there’s a way around this. Mix and match words! Sure, skateboard may be guessed instantly and so will turtle but a skateboard_turtle isn’t a real word and will take over 624 trillion years to crack.

tiny turtle on a tiny skateboard using his front legs to roll forward

For a more in depth look into strong passwords read on


By taking all of these factors into account you will be able to create some of the strongest passwords ever. Admittedly however, it can sometimes be hard to think up a good password. So next I’ll teach you tips on how to make your own easy to remember but hard to crack password. So with current technology passwords equal to or greater than 13 characters long are pretty much uncrackable. Meaning step one is to make sure whatever password you make is at least 13 characters long. Furthermore, it should be easy for you to remember. One of the best and easiest ways to do this is simply use sentences as passwords. Something like, “I really like Chinese food” or “this password is to hard to crack” are great examples. Unfortunately, due to the misconceptions of what makes a good password many sites have all sorts of hurdles you have to jump threw to make a valid password. Due to this it’s generally a good idea to make passwords that include at least 2 special characters, 2 numeric characters, and 2 alphabetic characters while avoiding using any 3 or more of the same character in a row. An easy way to accommodate this is to integrate these into your current password. For examples replacing “o” with “0”, “a” with “@”, “i” with “!”, or “space” with “_ “, to name a few. Just make sure whatever you substitute makes sense to you. Using this concept our last to example passwords might look like this, “!_re@11y_l!ke_ch!nese_f00d” and “th!s_p@ssw0rd_!s_h@rd_t0_cr@ck”.

If you take these steps into account next time you make a password than you can rest assured that the likeliness of it being cracked is slim to none. Plus, you’ll have the benefit of being able to easily remember your password therefore lowering the need to use some sort of password manager that would be devastating if in the wrong hands.

Learn more about your digital privacy:

ALA Choose Privacy Week

Privacy Paradox

Protect Your Privacy

Weapons of Math Destruction eBook | eAudiobook | Book

How-To-Tuesday: MY-ILL

My-ILL

In this week’s installment, Megan is in search of the book Mr. Show What Happened?!? The Complete Story and Episode Guide. Brookens doesn’t have it! I-Share doesn’t have it! Should she give up? No way. Not when there’s INTERLIBRARY LOAN (MY-ILL)!!!!!