Now Accepting Submissions for Undergraduate Research Award

Brookens Library is very pleased to announce that we are now accepting submissions for our third annual Undergraduate Research Award.

Brookens Library firmly supports the idea that undergraduate research, scholarly and creative activities are foundational components a complete education at UIS. 3 years ago, we created this award as a way for the Library to recognize and reward UIS undergraduate students who had produced exemplary work in pursuit of their interests and degree.

Brookens Library Undergraduate Research AwardThe judging for the Brookens Library Undergraduate Research Award is one of our favorite parts of the academic year. Usually, we librarians are involved at the beginning stages of a research project – helping our patrons find the information that they need to get started on a project. We get to sit down with students from a variety of disciplines with some truly fascinating information needs. Unfortunately, it’s a rare day when one of us actually gets to see some of the finished products. This research award is a unique and treasured window onto the excellent work that the UIS students have created.

About the only downside of the endeavor is that the Library only gets to recognize one student’s excellent. We’ve always had a competitive grouping of papers, with one just edging out a victory in our rubrics. But this year, we are very excited to say that we are awarding a second and a third place! Now, even more great work will be acknowledged and preserved. Apply today with a paper of project you have completed in the past year!

First Place: $250

Second Place: $100

Third Place: $50

You can see the winning papers from the previous years here: https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/handle/2142/74820

Details of the award, the submission process, the timeline and the judging rubric can be found here: http://libguides.uis.edu/research_award

 

Winter Break Special Hours & Closures

Finals Week marks the end of another semester at UIS.  We will reduce our hours and have special holiday closures over the winter break from Saturday, December 10, 2016 through Monday, January 16, 2017. A complete list of our hours is always available on our website for your convenience.

Reduced Hours of Operation (Saturday, December 10 – Thursday, December 22):

Saturday & Sunday: CLOSED

Monday – Friday: OPEN 9AM – 5 PM

Holiday CLOSURE:

Friday, December 23 – Monday,  January 2

We re-open with reduced hours on Tuesday, January 3

Spring Semester Reduced Hours: (Tuesday, January 3 – Sunday, January 15)

Saturday & Sunday: CLOSED

Monday – Friday: OPEN 9AM – 5PM

Special Closure: Martin Luther King Jr. Day (Monday, January 16): CLOSED

We re-open with regular Spring Semester hours Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Calendar view of hours December 2016

Calendar View of Library Hours January 2017

Check Out Our Winter Read Recommendations!

Let it Snow Brookens Library Chalkboard Art

We hope your semester has been successful and that you are looking forward a peaceful winter break.  To help you relax and refresh, we’ve compiled a list of winter read recommendations in our Cloud Library collection.  These downloadable eBooks and eAudiobooks are accessible from wherever you are spending your break with the free app.  Unfamiliar with the downloadable eBooks or eAudiobooks in our Cloud Library collection?  Learn more here, and, as always, we’ll be happy to help you download the free app and set up your account at the library main desk. Enjoy your break!

Brookens Holiday Hours and Closures

We know you’re busy studying for finals so we wanted to remind you that our hours change during Winter Break.

Holiday / Winter Break Recess (12/10- 1/2)

Sat-Sun (12/10 – 12/18): Closed
Mon-Friday (12/12 – 12/22): 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fri-Tue (12/23 – 12/27): Holiday Closure
Wed-Fri (12/28 – 12/30): BUILDING CLOSED/E-mail services available 10 AM – 2 PM
Sat-Mon (12/31 – 1/2): Holiday Closure

Brookens Library will re-open with regular hours on Tuesday, January 3, 2017.

December Staff Picks

The winter holidays are just around the corner so that means we have a new month’s worth of book picks! This month student employee Rachel and Clinical Faculty Librarian Nancy Weichert have selected books we think you might enjoy!

Student Worker RachelRachel’s List

  1. Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
  2. City of Bones by Cassandra Clare
  3. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll
  4. Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
  5. The Night Trilogy by Elie Wiesel
  6. Night in Bombay by Louis Bromfield
  7. The Shining by Stephen King
  8. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  9. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkein
  10. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
  11. Gone Girl: a Novel by Gillian Flynn
  12. The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
  13. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  14. Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  15. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  16. Bleak House by Charles Dickens
  17. Twilight by Stephanie Meyer
  18. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
  19. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
  20. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Parts One and Two by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, and Jack Thorne
  21. The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America by Erik Larson
  22. The Longest Ride by Nicholas Sparks
  23. The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown

 

NancyNancy’s List

  1. Amerikanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  2. Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff
  3. Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt
  4. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
  5. Siddartha by Herman Hesse
  6. Just Mercy:  a Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson
  7. Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates
  8. Thank You for Your Service by David Finkel
  9. Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Mathew Desmond
  10. Mary Coin by Marisa Silver
  11. Citizen: an American Lyric by Claudia Rankine
  12. Arcadia by Lauren Groff
  13. Even Cowgirls get the Blues by Tom Robbins
  14. What is the What by Dave Eggers
  15. The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
  16. Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital by Sheri Fink
  17. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery
  18. Room: a Novel by Emma Donoghue
  19. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

Find Your Place at Brookens

web-brookens-exterior-building

As  the new University Librarian at Brookens Library, I am also serving my profession as President of the Illinois Library Association. The mission of ILA includes references to leadership, learning and access to information. It clearly states that

“This access is essential for an open democratic society, an informed electorate, and the advancement of knowledge for all people. “

And that’s the crux of it. I didn’t become a librarian because I liked books, or to categorize knowledge or even to preserve information. These are all important functions in what librarians do, but it is ensuring access to all, extending opportunities to learn to all, empowering people, that drew me to being a librarian.

Librarians have a great and awesome responsibility to their communities, and so when I am confused, or without explanation, it’s a good time to explore core values and remember why I became a librarian, and why I believe deeply in the ALA Bill of Rights and the Freedom to Read.

This week there are many others writing about libraries. American Library Association President Julie Todaro released a statement that includes these words: “”Libraries provide a safe place for individuals of all ages and backgrounds and for difficult discussions on social issues.  Our nation’s libraries serve all community members, including people of color, immigrants, people with disabilities, and the most vulnerable in our communities, offering services and educational resources that transform communities, open minds and promote inclusion and diversity.”

She continues with the idea that libraries are tolerant, inclusive, promote understanding and work to abolish cultural invisibility.

On behalf of the staff and faculty of Brookens Library, I would like to remind our campus community that the library will continue to practice the core values of librarianship. We invite you to explore the resources we have available to expand your knowledge, understanding and cultural awareness. We invite you to experience the comfort of finding your very own place in Brookens Library, whether you seek quiet and solitude or busy and active spaces. We invite you to interact with our staff who can assist you in finding more to explore and experience, not only at Brookens Library, but curated sources found in institutional repositories or librarian-created research guides at other institutions.

Blogger Zoe Fisher speaks of her love for libraries and their place in her world. She mentions there have always been libraries even through wars and the destruction of books and libraries. She closes with this thought about the chaos of the last few days: “There will be librarians to help people make sense of senseless things. And when I think of that, I am less afraid.”

Find your informational resources at Brookens Library. Find helpful staff at Brookens Library. Find your comfortable place at Brookens Library.

Holtz Memorial Lecture: Lincoln Legacy Lecture 10/20

The University of Illinois Springfield will host the 14th Annual Lincoln Legacy Lecture on October 20, 2016, presented by the UIS Center for State Policy and Leadership, in cooperation with the Chancellor Naomi B. Lynn Distinguished Chair in Lincoln Studies.

Brookens Library has selected the program as the 2016/2017 Holtz Memorial Lecture. “Lincoln and Reconstruction: America’s Struggle for Equality” will feature three Lincoln scholars: Dr. Michael Burlingame, Naomi B. Lynn Distinguished Chair in Lincoln Studies, UIS, Dr. Allen Guelzo, Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil war Era Gettysburg College, and Dr Brooks Simpson, Foundation Professor of History, Arizon State University.

The event, at 7:00 p.m. in Brookens Auditorium, is free and open to the public. We hope to see you there.

Lincoln Legacy Lecture